Items filtered by date: February 2022

Tuesday, 22 February 2022 00:00

How to Deal With Chronic Foot Pain

When your feet hurt, it is not easy to to do any form of exercise. However, it is thought that being active can actually help to reduce pain in the long run. If putting weight on your feet for any period of time is simply too painful, taking to the water might help. Exercising in a pool eliminates the pressure on your feet while allowing you to move other parts of the body. Applying ice to the sore areas of your feet is another way to reduce the pain. Taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, available over the counter, can also help. Devices such as canes, walking sticks, or walkers can absorb some of the weight placed on your feet when you stand or walk. Also, check that your footwear is comfortable, roomy, cushioned and supportive. Another key contributor to foot pain is being overweight, so the combination of a healthier diet and added exercise will likely be beneficial. If your pain increases or becomes unbearable, it’s a good idea to consult a podiatrist for a complete examination and diagnosis, as well as other treatment options.

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with Dr. Sheldon D. Simon from Kentucky . Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Owensboro, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 15 February 2022 00:00

Healthy Weight Equals Happy Feet

Individuals with a body mass index (BMI) that is more than 30 are considered to be obese. Obesity is believed to go hand in hand with certain foot disorders such as heel pain, tendonitis, arthritis, and other conditions caused from the stress of excess weight placed on the feet and ankles. Obesity can also put a person at risk for type II diabetes, which often leads to the development of other foot conditions. Losing weight can help reduce excess pressure on the feet and ankles, however exercising can be difficult when your feet are in pain. A podiatrist can treat foot conditions brought on by obesity and help alleviate foot pain by suggesting specific stretches and prescribing custom orthotics.

The more you weigh, the harder your feet must work to support your body. If you’re an obese individual and are concerned about your feet, contact Dr. Sheldon D. Simon from Kentucky . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Obesity and Your Feet

People who are overweight are putting more pressure on their ankles, knees, and hips as well as their feet. This unfortunately can lead to variety of different issues.

Problems & Complications Stemming from Obesity

  • When the body is overweight, it tries to compensate by changing the way that it moves. An obese person may lean forward and put extra weight on the wrong part of the foot. This puts unnecessary stress on the feet.
  • Obese people are also more likely to develop type II diabetes which is a condition that causes a lot of foot problems. People with diabetes often don’t feel the cuts and sores that they may have on their feet, which can lead to more complicated and severe issues.
  • Plantar fasciitis is another foot condition that can be caused by obesity. Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the tissue along the bottom of the foot, which causes pain and stiffness while walking and climbing stairs.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Owensboro, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How Obesity Affects Your Feet
Monday, 14 February 2022 00:00

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Tuesday, 08 February 2022 00:00

What Is “Pump Bump?”

Anyone who has ever worn high heels can probably attest to the fact that they are generally not the most comfortable shoes in the world. High heels can be damaging to the feet, increasing one’s risk of developing foot deformities like bunions and hammertoes. One type of deformity seen in people who are frequent or daily high heel wearers is a Haglund’s deformity, also known as “pump bump.” This condition occurs when an existing bony deformity that some people have on the back of their heel is irritated by habitual high heel wear. Pump bump can cause heel pain, blisters, bursitis, and Achilles tendonitis. If you are suffering from any type of heel pain, it is suggested that you seek the care of a podiatrist.

High heels have a history of causing foot and ankle problems. If you have any concerns about your feet or ankles, contact Dr. Sheldon D. Simon from Kentucky . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Effects of High Heels on the Feet

High heels are popular shoes among women because of their many styles and societal appeal.  Despite this, high heels can still cause many health problems if worn too frequently.

Which Parts of My Body Will Be Affected by High Heels?

  • Ankle Joints
  • Achilles Tendon – May shorten and stiffen with prolonged wear
  • Balls of the Feet
  • Knees – Heels cause the knees to bend constantly, creating stress on them
  • Back – They decrease the spine’s ability to absorb shock, which may lead to back pain.  The vertebrae of the lower back may compress.

What Kinds of Foot Problems Can Develop from Wearing High Heels?

  • Corns
  • Calluses
  • Hammertoe
  • Bunions
  • Morton’s Neuroma
  • Plantar Fasciitis

How Can I Still Wear High Heels and Maintain Foot Health?

If you want to wear high heeled shoes, make sure that you are not wearing them every day, as this will help prevent long term physical problems.  Try wearing thicker heels as opposed to stilettos to distribute weight more evenly across the feet.  Always make sure you are wearing the proper shoes for the right occasion, such as sneakers for exercising.  If you walk to work, try carrying your heels with you and changing into them once you arrive at work.  Adding inserts to your heels can help cushion your feet and absorb shock. Full foot inserts or metatarsal pads are available. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Owensboro, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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The presence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage) and peripheral artery disease (poor circulation) in many diabetic patients creates a perfect storm of factors that can make wounds difficult to detect and take longer to heal. Chronic wounds that don’t heal (ulcers) are potentially very dangerous to both the overall health of the patient as well as their affected limb. There are eight steps every diabetic should take to help prevent such ulcers: 1) check your feet daily for cuts, growths or red spots, 2) wash and thoroughly dry your feet every day, 3) moisturize your feet, except between the toes, 4) trim your toenails straight across, but not too short, 5) avoid walking barefoot, and wear shoes that fit well, 6) protect your feet from extreme heat or cold, 7) elevate your feet as much as possible when sitting, and exercise your toes and ankles to aid circulation, and 8) have a podiatrist examine your feet at least once a year.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Sheldon D. Simon from Kentucky . Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Owensboro, KY . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care

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